A Second Chance at Sarah COver

With his wife dying in the hospital, John has one chance – one day, in fact – to save her. To do it, he must travel back through time and stop her from sealing her fate and his. That’s the easy part. First, he has to convince a woman who barely knew him that years later they will be in love and have a family together.

This is an interesting spin on the butterfly effect time travel type of story in that there’s no mystery. John knows exactly what Sarah will do to doom herself and he even knows when. He’s able to make a devilish bargain to get himself sent back to stop it, knowing exactly what needs to be done. Unfortunately, it happened before they knew each other…so that’s a problem. The demon he makes the bargain with also has other plans in motion and has his own reasons for being so accepting of John’s deal.

The real beauty of this story is that, for its apparent simplicity, it’s devilishly twisted. It seems very formulaic at the outset, but even in its short duration it works in a few twists along the way. Just when it seems that the story has run its course, there’s a new wrinkle and what treads dangerously close to a quick, sappy love story works its way into a sappy love story with some teeth to it. As soon as you think it’s over and they all lived happily ever after, you realize you’re only halfway through this tale.

My Take: Cards on the table: Joysuke Wong’s art didn’t do much for me. To be fair, though, that’s a style issue more than an execution issue. But I felt the light style of the art detracted at times from the story. The story, again, is solid – better than I expected going in and better than I thought it was going to be at the beginning. It’s the sort of story where you know how it’s going to end, but still enjoy the ride and find a few twists and turns along the way. It has enough bite to be interesting without going over the edge, making it a solid “young adult” offering that even a grumpy old man like myself can enjoy.

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Larry Mac was born and raised in Cleveland – yet another calamity to befall that once proud town. He grew up with roleplaying games because video games weren’t invented way back then and has since devoted himself to music, movies and anything else that distracts him from what passes for his real life. After realizing that his years as a working-class computer nerd had made him bitter and miserable he decided to be a writer, so here he is – ready to tell you why “Sharknado” is a better film than “Gone With the Wind” and why painful dental procedures are better than “Old Boy”.